Home » 2015 » March

Making Sense of OSHA Requirements for 29 CFR 1910 Cleanrooms Part 4

by Gerbig in General Cleanroom. Comments Off on Making Sense of OSHA Requirements for 29 CFR 1910 Cleanrooms Part 4

In the last three posts, we have broken down OSHA requirements so the 29 CFR 1910 standard is easier to understand. We have covered everything from basics to hazardous materials. Here we will complete the series with ventilation, personal protective equipment, and materials handling/storage.

Ventilation. This is in the Occupational health and environmental control section. An exhaust ventilation system removes contaminated air from a space and is comprised of two or more of the following:

Enclosure or hood
Duct work
Dust collecting equipment
Exhauster
Discharge stack

Whenever employee noise exposures equal or exceed an 8-hour time-weighted average sound level of 85 decibels measured on the A scale (slow response), or a dose of fifty percent, then an employer must administer a continuing, effective hearing conservation program (described in paragraphs (c) through (o) of this section in the standard.)

Personal Protective Equipment. An employer must provide PPE, for the:

Eyes
Face
Head
Extremities

It … Read More »

Making Sense of OSHA Requirements for 29 CFR 1910 Cleanrooms Part 3: Hazardous Materials

by Gerbig in General Cleanroom. Comments Off on Making Sense of OSHA Requirements for 29 CFR 1910 Cleanrooms Part 3: Hazardous Materials

In parts one and two, we summarized the OSHA requirements for cleanrooms to make these topics simpler: OSHA posters, 3000 Log, medical services & first aid, exit routes & emergency action plans, fire prevention, and fire protection. Here we will continue by covering hazardous materials, substances, and exposure.

Hazardous Materials. Every employer must determine that compressed gas cylinders are in a safe condition; the safe condition must be determinable by visual inspection. Inspections of materials should be conducted as outlined in 49 CFR parts 171-179 and 14 CFR part 103.In the case those regulations are not applicable, conduct inspections according to Compressed Gas Association Pamphlets C-6-1968 and C-8-1962. They are referenced in Sec. 1910.6. Flammable liquids. A list of highly hazardous chemicals that present a potential for a catastrophic event at or above the threshold (flashpoint at or below 199.4 °F … Read More »

Making Sense of OSHA Requirements for 29 CFR 1910 Cleanrooms Part 2: Fire Prevention

by Gerbig in General Cleanroom. Comments Off on Making Sense of OSHA Requirements for 29 CFR 1910 Cleanrooms Part 2: Fire Prevention

Cleanroom OSHA requirements can be overwhelming to digest. They are far more understandable and manageable when you break down the sections into clear summaries of the guidelines. In part one, we covered OSHA posters, 3000 Log, medical services & first aid, and exit routes & emergency action plans. In this installment, we will lay out fire prevention and protection.

OSHA standards require that you have a fire prevention plan and follow fire protection requirements. What needs to be included in the plan, and which equipment must meet the requirements?

Fire Prevention Plan – This is to control the accumulated flammable and combustible waste materials. A prevention plan must include:

List of all major fire hazards
Proper handling and storage procedures for hazardous materials
Potential ignition sources and their control
Type of fire protection equipment necessary to control each major hazard
Procedures to control accumulations of flammable and … Read More »

Making Sense of OSHA Requirements for 29 CFR 1910 Cleanrooms Part 1

by Gerbig in General Cleanroom. Comments Off on Making Sense of OSHA Requirements for 29 CFR 1910 Cleanrooms Part 1

OSHA industry standards apply to most, if not all, cleanroom operations in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 29 CFR. This standard is more commonly known as the General Industry Standard, 29 CFR 1910. (Not every cleanroom falls under standard 1910.) These standards are complex, so we have summarized the primary components to make them easier to understand.

Minimum Requirements 

At minimum, all cleanroom facilities must have the following:

OSHA Poster – This informs workers of their rights and must be prominently displayed in the facility.
OSHA 3000 Log – If you are not classified as a partially exempt industry and you have more than ten employees, you have to record work-related injuries and illnesses using OSHA forms 300, 300A, and 301. Covered employers must prepare and maintain records of serious occupational injuries and illnesses using the OSHA 300 log.
Medical Services and First … Read More »