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5 Musts for Keeping your Cleanroom HVAC Clean and Working

by Gerbig in General Cleanroom. Comments Off on 5 Musts for Keeping your Cleanroom HVAC Clean and Working

If you have a cleanroom, you need to take care of your HVAC. Here are 5 checkpoints to keep you running efficiently and economically.

Your HVAC is an integral part of any cleanroom. Without it, your air quality would be compromised. Much like any other filter system, it does require routine maintenance. Cleaning your HVAC will not only keep it running properly, but also reduce energy costs, lengthen the lifespan of the system, and minimize the need for repair.

Here are five steps you should include in your routine preventative HVAC maintenance for optimal performance:

Clean the coils. Clean coils are important to mitigate changes of bacterial growth in the system. They also keep the system highly efficient. This is one of the most fundamental maintenance points for your HVAC. According to Controlled Environments “Optimal HVAC Performance Means Keeping it Clean,” you should “Clean … Read More »

Why Small Particles Stick – Clean the Cleanroom

by Gerbig in General Cleanroom. Comments Off on Why Small Particles Stick – Clean the Cleanroom

We all know that the smaller the particle, the harder it is to clean. They always get stuck in those tiny, hard-to-reach spaces. Here’s why.

Dispersion forces. They make a gecko’s feet stick to walls. They also make small particles get stuck in really tiny places and cause them to be so hard to clean. Let’s see why this kind of force is making your life cleaning the cleanroom so difficult.

Molecules that have dipoles, or permanently positively and negatively charged sides are associated with polar and hydrogen bonding forces. However, dispersion forces are a property of all molecules regardless of an inherent dipole. Since electrons are always in motion, momentary fluctuations can occur when more electrons are on one side of a molecule than the other. This causes a momentary negative charge on the side with more electrons and a … Read More »

Cleaning the Components in Electronics Manufacturing: Part 2

by Gerbig in General Cleanroom. Comments Off on Cleaning the Components in Electronics Manufacturing: Part 2

More options for cleaning electronic components and maintaining a cleanroom for electronics manufacturers.

When electronic components are exposed to humidity or fluctuating temperatures, protective layers can erode, thereby releasing ionic substances. The risk of electro-migration and dendritic growth makes cleaning electronics in these environments necessary. In part 1, we covered solvent options. Here we will explore water-based media.

Ultrasound cleaning with water-based media offers practical solutions to electronics manufacturers. The electrical signals from the ultrasound influences the cleaning action for the cleansing agent. The lower the frequency, the more energy is released by sound waves. Cleaning tests will help you figure out the right combination of cleansing agent and ultrasound frequency.

Carbon dioxide offers a nice dry alternative. Compressed carbon dioxide possesses excellent properties as a solvent on nonpolar impurities like grease and oil. With low viscosity and interfacial tension, supercritical CO2 has … Read More »

Cleaning the Components in Electronics Manufacturing: Part 1

by Gerbig in General Cleanroom. Comments Off on Cleaning the Components in Electronics Manufacturing: Part 1

Electronic components in adverse environments require careful cleaning to remain compliant. This series explores the means of doing so.  

Thanks to no-clean fluxes and soldering pastes, the need to clean components in electronics manufacturing has decreased significantly. However, this is only the case for components used in non-critical atmospheric environments. Adverse environments, like humid or fluctuating temperatures, can erode the protective layer applied in the no-clean process. This releases ionizing substances that promote electro-migration and dendritic growth. You’ll find this in narrow spaces under components and between connections and contact surfaces. Additionally, fluxes, residues of soldering agents and adhesives, and dust need to be removed from electronic components.

In choosing a cleansing agent, you need to consider the subject material as well as the nature and quantity of the impurities to remove. Cleaning agents for electronics include solvents, water-based media containing … Read More »